For most people, there’s no middle ground when it comes to beets. They either enjoy them or they don’t. If you’re in the latter group, you might want to rethink your position. The benefits of beets – and beet juice – are well documented.

Here are just a few of the reasons why you should probably consider adding beet juice to your dietary regimen:

Reducing Blood Pressure

According to research, people who drink beet juice on a regular basis have lower blood pressure readings.1 The reason is thought to be the nitrates that are found in the vegetable. Nitrate is a compound that the body converts into nitric oxide, a gas that performs various functions, including helping to relax blood vessels. This, in turn, helps to reduce blood pressure.2

Boosting Your Exercise Routine

Scientific studies seem to support the idea that beet juice consumption might help improve athletic performance. One study showed that cyclists who drank two cups of beet juice on a daily basis improved their 10-kilometer race times significantly.3 Another study showed that beets can also help increase stamina.4

Cognitive Health

Beet Juice | NucificSince beet juice helps relax blood vessels, it may also help improve the flow of blood to the brain. The nitrate in beet juice helps to increase the supply of oxygen to the brain, as well.

According to a study involving elderly people, participants who followed a diet high in nitrates showed a substantially improved blood supply in the frontal lobes of the brain.

Deterioration of these lobes has been associated with severe cognitive problems.5

Other research shows the benefits of beets when combined with exercise. A six-week study involved nearly 30 older adults who were diagnosed with high blood pressure. Participants took medication to address their blood pressure problem, but they did not follow any kind of exercise routine. One group of participants drank beet juice three times a week before walking on a treadmill, while the other took a placebo.

According to the results, the group drinking the beet juice had brains that more closely resembled those of younger people.6

 

Antioxidant Properties

Beets contain compounds that combat the effects of oxidative stress. For instance, they contain betanin, which is a powerful antioxidant.7 One of the main reasons antioxidants are important is that they inhibit the effects of free radicals. These are molecules that are missing an electron. They scour the body to replace that electron, and they don’t care where they find it. This often means they’ll take them from the cells that make up our muscles and tissues – sometimes leading to severe damage.8

Rich in Minerals

One of the more important benefits of beets is that they are chock-full of vital nutrients. For example, beets contain iron, calcium, magnesium, copper, and zinc. They’re particularly high in potassium and manganese.9 Potassium has been linked to strong bones, energy, reduced blood pressure, and a reduced risk of stroke.10 Manganese helps reduce the risk of bone loss and joint pain. It may also play a role in lowering the chances of developing health issues due to an excess amount of sugar in the blood.11

Beets also contain folate. This B vitamin helps support the growth of cells and has also been shown to support heart health.12 There is evidence that people who don’t have enough folate may be at a higher risk of developing depression.13

In addition, beets are high in vitamin C. This is important because vitamin C not only has antioxidant properties, it also helps the body absorb iron. Vitamin C also helps to produce collagen, a substance that makes skin stronger, and even plays a role in helping wounds heal faster.14

Beet Juice | NucificEye Health

A form of vitamin A in beet juice known as beta-carotene has been shown to help reduce the risk of age-related vision problems.15

Beta-carotene is an antioxidant, which helps keep free radicals at bay. Free radicals have been linked to many problems involving the eyes.16

Start Here: Beet Juice Recipes

If the prospect of drinking straight beet juice doesn’t sound appetizing, there are several ways you can spruce it up by adding juice from veggies, fruits, and roots.

For example, you can combine beets, ginger, ice, and apples into a healthy, great-tasting smoothie.

\Beets also mix well with orange and carrot juice, providing a fantastic drink that is high in vitamins A and C. You can even mix beets, plums, and grapes in a blender to make an antioxidant-rich smoothie.17

The Bottom Line

As you can see, the health benefits of beets are numerous. Think twice before discounting this humble, yet powerful, vegetable. Drinking beet juice offers a ton of potential health boosts, giving your body the nutrients it needs to stay healthy and strong.

For more veggie goodness, keep reading on the Nucific blog here:
The Truth about the Karela Juice Trend (And 5 Possible Benefits)
[NEWS]: Beetroot Juice Might Give Your Exercise Routine a Boost
High Fiber Vegetables That You Should Eat Every Day


Sources
1.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23596162
2.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16999221
3.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22248502
4.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22709704
5.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3018552
6.http://news.wfu.edu/2010/11/03/benefits-of-beet-juice
7.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425174
8.http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/antiox.html
9.http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2348/2
10.https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/potassium
11.https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/manganese
12.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652362
13.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1810582
14.https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-vitamin-c/art-20363932
15.https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/betacarotene
16.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20829643
17.https://www.healthambition.com/7-delicious-nutritious-beetroot-juice-recipes

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About the Author

Suzan Cory

Suzan Cory is a freelance writer and editor that specializes in health and nutrition. She holds a green belt in karate and enjoys gardening. When she's not researching and writing about the latest health news, you'll find her hiking with her two dogs. She lives in Colorado with her husband.