Most people know that going to the gym is good for them. But why? Understanding the incredible benefits of physical activity can help answer this question and can help if you need motivation to work out.

In almost every case, getting physical exercise is full of health benefits that will help improve both your mental and physical well-being.1

If you find that you need motivation to work out, here are seven great benefits of going to the gym regularly:

Stress Reduction

When you’re feeling stressed, sometimes the last place you want to go is the gym. However, studies have shown that regular exercise can help to greatly reduce your stress levels.2

One of the chief ways in which aerobic exercise can reduce stress is by releasing certain chemicals in your body, which can reduce the pressure you feel from your daily stressors. Not only that, but regular exercise can help kick-start the “process which confers enduring resilience to stress.”3

In other words, the more you exercise, the better you tolerate stress. And who doesn’t want that?

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Gym Benefits | NucificWhen it comes to exercise, you’re not only improving your overall fitness and muscles, but studies suggest you may just be happier as a result, too.4 In one promising study, researchers found that regular aerobic exercise may increase serotonin levels in various brain regions. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is often cited for its role in a person’s happiness.5

So, even if you’re feeling a bit down, or just don’t feel like today is a good day for physical activity, think again. A quick trip to the gym may just be the boost you need!

Weight Regulation

If you need motivation to work out, weight loss is one of the most well-known benefits of physical activity and fitness routines. Exercising your muscles and getting your heart rate up through aerobic exercise is a proven way to lose or regulate your weight.6

And weight loss offers some major health benefits, as well. Losing weight can help stave off some potentially serious health problems.7

Whether you’re trying to lose weight, or you’re working out to avoid gaining weight, regular exercise is one of the best things you can do, so get to it!

Walk with Confidence

Physical activity may also help boost your self-confidence and self-esteem. In one study, female participants’ physical activity and self-esteem levels were monitored for two years. Researchers concluded that the women’s self-esteem levels went up as their body mass index, or BMI, decreased.8

So, what does that mean for you? Well, if you want to look great and feel great, start a solid fitness routine and give your local gym a try. Doing so may help your confidence levels soar.

A Healthy Heart

Right now in America, heart problems are the leading cause of death for both men and women. However, various studies over the years have proven that regular exercise can help reduce your risk of suffering from a heart-related condition.9

And the path to good heart health doesn’t mean you have to run a marathon every single day. The American Heart Association maintains that a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate exercise, five days a week, can help a healthy adult promote and maintain heart health.10

One great way to fit regular, moderate exercise into your schedule is by going for a brisk, daily walk. If you think you’ll get bored, consider listening to music or an audiobook, or plan different walking routes. You may be surprised how quickly time flies.

Keep Your Wits!

When it comes to fitness, consider the amazing benefits you’re providing not just your body, but your mind, too. Studies indicate that being physically active has the ability to help boost brain function, including memory.11

Another benefit of moderate exercise is that a trip to the gym improves overall cognitive function, regardless of your age.12 So, not only will your friends and family be amazed at how great you look and feel after hitting the gym – they’ll be doubly impressed when you beat them at a game of chess!

Sweet Dreams

Gym Benefits | NucificFew things are as refreshing and invigorating as getting a quality night of sleep. However, approximately 50 to 70 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disorders and wakefulness, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.13

Long, sleepless nights can lead to long, difficult days. If this is you, exercise and a solid fitness routine may hold the key to boosting the frequency and quality of your sleep. In fact, some studies show promising results that exercise may be a natural remedy for insomnia.14

Getting to the gym to exercise isn’t just for people who suffer from insomnia. For someone who suffers from restless legs syndrome (RLS), for instance, exercise has been known to help mild or moderate cases.15

DO Sweat it!

Whenever you’re having trouble getting moving and need motivation to work out, you can see that when it comes to improving your physical, emotional, and cognitive well-being, regular exercise offers an incredible array of benefits. And while gyms are great places to work out, know that there are plenty of places and ways in which you can focus on healthy exercise habits. The important thing is to get creative, and get moving!

Learn More:
Why You Should Always Exercise to Music
[NEWS]: Beetroot Juice Might Give Your Exercise Routine a Boost
5 Simple DIY Lunchtime Workout Ideas (When The Gym Isn’t An Option)

Sources
1.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1402378
2.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17148741
3.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11148895
4.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC474733
5.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2077351
6.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3630467
7https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3406229
8.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21282842
9.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3396114
10.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3405391
11.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21722657
12.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3768113
13.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19961
14.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15892929
15.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28886918

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